Shop Mobile More Submit  Join Login
Pineapple Girl by Wolfberry-J Pineapple Girl by Wolfberry-J

Inspired by the folktale Adene and the Pineapple Child from the Ga ethnic group of Ghana. A childless couple adopts supernatural child who is originally a pineapple. But a few happy years later, unforeseen events cause her to revert to her original form. Her father manages to grab onto a bit of the hair on her head just before she reverted to pineapple form. Holding all that is left of his daughter, he clutches the hair to his chest and weeps in despair. This is the myth of how men came to have hair on their chests.

Available as:

Media:Adobe Illustrator with watercolor background

Illustrator tools/effects used: gradient, gradient mesh, pen, blend, brush, text, shape tools, mesh envelope

Part of series inspired by folklore about plant material changing into human form (and in this case, back again):
Calabash Child


灵感来自加纳的民间故事《阿德内与凤梨孩儿》
Add a Comment:
 
:iconrootsandwingsglobal:
rootsandwingsglobal Featured By Owner Apr 4, 2017
Beautiful illustration. We'd like to invite you to collaborate on our storytelling project! It would be great to feature this piece! Please leave us a message or email rootsandwings.creative@gmail.com if you'd be interested in details. Thank you!
Reply
:iconrdizzy:
RDizzy Featured By Owner Jan 17, 2015  Hobbyist General Artist
what a sad story :( Beautiful illustration though.
Reply
:iconchestnuthare:
chestnuthare Featured By Owner Sep 29, 2014  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
This is really beautifully illustrated
Reply
:iconwolfberry-j:
Wolfberry-J Featured By Owner Sep 30, 2014
Thank you. :-)
Reply
:iconqwertynim:
Qwertynim Featured By Owner Apr 25, 2014  Student General Artist
That's cool
Reply
:iconwolfberry-j:
Wolfberry-J Featured By Owner Apr 26, 2014
Thanks for the fav. :-)
Reply
:iconqwertynim:
Qwertynim Featured By Owner May 6, 2014  Student General Artist
Good art deserves favs
Reply
:iconkaburninator:
kaburninator Featured By Owner Aug 24, 2013
she in pain or something?
Reply
:iconwolfberry-j:
Wolfberry-J Featured By Owner Aug 26, 2013
As a matter of fact, yes. ;-) The reasons are much clearer if you read the full folktale "Adene and the Pineapple Child", as retold in "West African Folktales".
Reply
:iconkaburninator:
kaburninator Featured By Owner Sep 6, 2013
intriguing, got a link?
Reply
:iconwolfberry-j:
Wolfberry-J Featured By Owner Sep 7, 2013
No link, but have ISBN :-)  "West African folktales", collected and translated by Jack Berry, from Northwestern University Press. ISBN 081010993X
Reply
:iconalrathi:
Alrathi Featured By Owner Apr 17, 2013  Student General Artist
Hot dayum, your art's so unique! Lol, I just went on a journey through your gallery XD I think I like this one best so far! It's a pretty sad story though T3T I'm almost afraid to eat a pineapple nowww~
Reply
:iconwolfberry-j:
Wolfberry-J Featured By Owner Apr 20, 2013
Thanks for visiting my gallery and reading the pineapple story. :-) I too would have liked to see a happier ending to the tale. Appreciate the feedback. =D
Reply
:iconalrathi:
Alrathi Featured By Owner Apr 22, 2013  Student General Artist
Aw, sometimes the best stories are the ones that teach us to appreciate what we have though =) *And you're most welcome! X3*
Reply
:iconjdluvasqee:
JDLuvaSQEE Featured By Owner Dec 10, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
Cool!!!
Reply
:iconwolfberry-j:
Wolfberry-J Featured By Owner Dec 25, 2012
Thank you. =D
Reply
:iconjdluvasqee:
JDLuvaSQEE Featured By Owner Dec 25, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
Welcome!
Reply
:iconakshay-nair:
akshay-nair Featured By Owner May 23, 2012  Hobbyist
very cool
y no more deviations ?:)
Reply
:iconwolfberry-j:
Wolfberry-J Featured By Owner May 29, 2012
Thanks. And yes, there is a new deviation up. I finished the final one in this series: Calabash Child. :dance:
Reply
:iconaivilo0:
Aivilo0 Featured By Owner Apr 12, 2012
I haven't heard of this folktale but it sounds interesting and I love
this picture!!
Reply
:iconwolfberry-j:
Wolfberry-J Featured By Owner Apr 16, 2012
Thank you :-)
Reply
:iconmrfix1978:
mrfix1978 Featured By Owner Mar 31, 2012
Perfectly!!!
Reply
:iconwolfberry-j:
Wolfberry-J Featured By Owner Apr 5, 2012
Thanks for the fav :-)
Reply
:iconartbygloriacolom:
ArtbyGloriaColom Featured By Owner Mar 20, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
Soooo cute!!!! And sweet!!!! Now I want pineapples :)
Reply
:iconwolfberry-j:
Wolfberry-J Featured By Owner Mar 23, 2012
Thanks, I'm glad you like it =D I have to admit that I am not a fan of pineapples, but after reading up on what kind of pineapples grow in Ghana, I too want pineapples, and am especially curious about the kind called "Sugarloaf" which I've never seen/eaten :drool:
Reply
:iconartbygloriacolom:
ArtbyGloriaColom Featured By Owner Apr 15, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
:D Pineapples are originally from the Caribbean islands. They grew tiny and wild until American and Puerto Rican scientists genetically engineered them to be "huge". The sugar loaf has to be the biggest success as it lost none of its original sweetness (as most engineered things do). These little guys have become international (to the betterment of the world I think!!) :D :D There's nothing like a dusty roadside pineapple (or coconut) to cap off a perfect day!!! :D
Reply
:iconwolfberry-j:
Wolfberry-J Featured By Owner Apr 16, 2012
Fascinating! I didn't know pineapples used to be so little! Thanks for sharing this history :-)

I knew that pineapples were not indigenous to Africa, which made me wonder when the Pineapple Child folktales of Ghana originated. My cursory research didn't turn out a date for the introduction of pineapples to West Africa. I would guess the details of the story took their current form within the last few hundred years, after pineapples were introduced from the Americas. But I suspect the basic structure of the folktale itself predated pineapples, since there have been non-pineapple variations of the tale in various West African ethnic groups.

It is interesting how plants travel around the world :-) Now I want to eat a sugarloaf too.
Reply
:iconartbygloriacolom:
ArtbyGloriaColom Featured By Owner May 18, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
Yum!! :) You definitely should... although I would advise you to avoid August and September (hurricane season), but I think there's some inspiration here for your work as well plus the amazing foods!! :)

I love folktales and how they evolve over time. Some are more ancient than others, and some are being created as we speak, but there's always an otherworldly undercurrent that goes beyond geographic regions! :)
Reply
:iconwolfberry-j:
Wolfberry-J Featured By Owner May 30, 2012
Thanks for the travel advice :-) I'd love to go somewhere warm for a while (without dealing with severe weather, of course :-) ) And of course, learning about the local folklore and history is the best part of it!
Reply
:iconartbygloriacolom:
ArtbyGloriaColom Featured By Owner Jun 5, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
:D Indeed!! :) I'm actually thinking of taking up (at an academic level) of the vernacular architecture of the Caribbean and other places... where it comes from and where its going... a pretty fun subject considering the bright and cooky nature of the subject matter! :) Not the same as folklore... but somehow tied into the place's culture all the same.
Reply
:iconwolfberry-j:
Wolfberry-J Featured By Owner Jun 9, 2012
The history and future of Caribbean architecture sounds like an enjoyable subject with everyday relevance! It would be a fortunate thing to study something that is both beautiful and practical! =D I hope you get to have fun with it. :-)
Reply
(1 Reply)
:iconcarloshurtadosoriano:
Fantastic work, dear friend!!!
Reply
:iconwolfberry-j:
Wolfberry-J Featured By Owner Mar 23, 2012
Thanks for the fav =D
Reply
Add a Comment:
 
×




Details

Submitted on
March 17, 2012
Image Size
156 KB
Resolution
544×700
Submitted with
Sta.sh
Link
Thumb
Embed

Stats

Views
2,841
Favourites
158 (who?)
Comments
36
×